Map It Out

Map It Out

NEED AN ACTION PLAN?

You’re in the right place! No matter where young people are at in their journey, the tips, strategies and resources below will help plan their future.

Middle School

  • Explore the possible crafts and salaries in the construction industry.  
  • Attend a construction career day and experience hands-on learning.  
  • Discuss industrial, commercial and residential construction, to learn the differences between these sectors and careers available. 
  • Research career and technical education (CTE) courses offered at local area high schools. Speak with the high school guidance counselors to find out which CTE courses are offered and what steps students need to take to enroll in those courses.

Freshman / Sophomore

  • Enroll in career and technical education (CTE) courses with a construction or architecture focus. High school guidance counselors can provide information about which CTE courses are offered and what steps student need to take to enroll.  
  • Research the differences between apprenticeship or craft training programs, technical or community colleges, and four-year degrees. Students may be able to join a pre-apprenticeship once they are 16-years-old to gain valuable hands-on experience. 

Junior

  • Enroll in or continue taking career and technical education (CTE) classes with a construction or architecture focus.  
  • Discuss the differences between apprenticeship or craft training programs, technical or community colleges, and four-year degrees. Students planning on pursuing a four-year degree related to construction management should take the SAT or ACT to prepare for college applications.   
  • Locate local pre-apprenticeship or craft training programs for on-the-job experience.  
  • Explore the possible crafts and salaries available in theconstruction industry.

Senior Year

  • Ensure students are on track to graduate at the end of the year by checking in with the school’s guidance counselor at the beginning of the year.  
  • Explore possible crafts and salaries available in theconstruction industry.  
  • Discuss the differences between the industrial, commercial and residential construction and research the top companies in each sector for potential opportunities.  
  • Enroll in or continue taking career and technical education (CTE) classes with a construction or architecture focus.  
  • Prepare for and take the SAT or ACT if pursuing a four-year degree related to construction. 
  • Review apprenticeship or craft training programs or technical or community college if pursuing construction education. Consider contacting or visiting any options that are of interest to learn about the next steps and how to apply.

Postsecondary Options

Apprenticeships or Craft Training

  • Explore possible crafts and salaries available in theconstruction industry.
  • Apply for apprenticeships or craft training programs to earn money while learning a craft. Programs include a variety of length options, from one to six years.  
  • Research companies that have training programs set up through their headquarters, on jobs sites or through local associations to begin earning while learning directly out of high school. 
  • Earn industry-recognized credentials and certifications upon successful completion.

Commmunity College or Technical School

  • Research application steps at community colleges or technical schools of interest, including admission deadlines and requirements.
  • Explore companies that pay new hires to attend technical or community colleges to get training at night while working during the day for an alternative of earn while learning program.
  • Earn college credit or industry-recognized certifications and credentials upon successful graduation.

Four-year Degree

  • Research application steps at colleges and universities of interest, including admission deadlines and requirements. There are various four and five-year programs that offer construction-related degrees from design, project management, estimating, human resources, architecture, engineering, and safety.  
  • Explore companies that offer internships to begin gaining hands-on experience while in school and building connections in the industry.  
  • Earn degrees in construction or architecture focused programs upon successful graduation and begin a career in the industry.

Middle School

  • Explore the possible crafts and salaries in the construction industry.  
  • Attend a construction career day and experience hands-on learning.  
  • Discuss industrial, commercial and residential construction, to learn the differences between these sectors and careers available. 
  • Research career and technical education (CTE) courses offered at local area high schools. Speak with the high school guidance counselors to find out which CTE courses are offered and what steps students need to take to enroll in those courses.

Freshman / Sophomore

 

  • Enroll in career and technical education (CTE) courses with a construction or architecture focus. High school guidance counselors can provide information about which CTE courses are offered and what steps student need to take to enroll.  
  • Research the differences between apprenticeship or craft training programs, technical or community colleges, and four-year degrees. Students may be able to join a pre-apprenticeship once they are 16-years-old to gain valuable hands-on experience. 

Junior

  • Enroll in or continue taking career and technical education (CTE) classes with a construction or architecture focus.  
  • Discuss the differences between apprenticeship or craft training programs, technical or community colleges, and four-year degrees. Students planning on pursuing a four-year degree related to construction management should take the SAT or ACT to prepare for college applications.   
  • Locate local pre-apprenticeship or craft training programs for on-the-job experience.  
  • Explore the possible crafts and salaries available in theconstruction industry.

Senior Year

 

  • Ensure students are on track to graduate at the end of the year by checking in with the school’s guidance counselor at the beginning of the year.  
  • Explore possible crafts and salaries available in theconstruction industry.  
  • Discuss the differences between the industrial, commercial and residential construction and research the top companies in each sector for potential opportunities.  
  • Enroll in or continue taking career and technical education (CTE) classes with a construction or architecture focus.  
  • Prepare for and take the SAT or ACT if pursuing a four-year degree related to construction. 
  • Review apprenticeship or craft training programs or technical or community college if pursuing construction education. Consider contacting or visiting any options that are of interest to learn about the next steps and how to apply.

Postsecondary Options

Apprenticeships or Craft Training

  • Explore possible crafts and salaries available in theconstruction industry.
  • Apply for apprenticeships or craft training programs to earn money while learning a craft. Programs include a variety of length options, from one to six years.  
  • Research companies that have training programs set up through their headquarters, on jobs sites or through local associations to begin earning while learning directly out of high school. 
  • Earn industry-recognized credentials and certifications upon successful completion.

Commmunity College or Technical School

  • Research application steps at community colleges or technical schools of interest, including admission deadlines and requirements.
  • Explore companies that pay new hires to attend technical or community colleges to get training at night while working during the day for an alternative of earn while learning program.
  • Earn college credit or industry-recognized certifications and credentials upon successful graduation.

Four-year Degree

  • Research application steps at colleges and universities of interest, including admission deadlines and requirements. There are various four and five-year programs that offer construction-related degrees from design, project management, estimating, human resources, architecture, engineering, and safety.  
  • Explore companies that offer internships to begin gaining hands-on experience while in school and building connections in the industry.  
  • Earn degrees in construction or architecture focused programs upon successful graduation and begin a career in the industry.

Get Started in Construction

Industry leaders share tips and insight for young adults interested in starting a career in construction.